What can I or my child expect to gain?

How does the Davis Program differ from other programs for learning difficulties?

What happens during the Davis program?

Can Davis Dyslexia Correction help solve other learning problems?

Why do you say correct instead of cure?

How does the program affect a person's self-esteem?

Who can benefit from the Davis Program?

How much improvement can be expected at the end of the 5-day Program?

Can someone lose their natural abilities after your program?

What happens after the program?

Are there alternatives to the program?

Can I speak with others who have been through your program?

What's my next step?

How can you know whether or not to discontinue phonics instruction with a dyslexic child?

After the Davis program, should you continue with phonics instruction, as this will probably be taught in school?

 

 Q: What can I or my child expect to gain?
A: The basic tools of literacy, including:
· The ability to recognize and correct perceptual distortions at will.
· The ability to focus attention.
· The knowledge and skills for how to eliminate confusions in words and symbols.
· Increased self-confidence and ability in reading, writing, math or physical skills.
· A successful and effective method of learning and studying that can be used throughout a lifetime.
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Q: How does the Davis Program differ from other programs for learning difficulties?
A: The Davis methods address the root cause of learning disabilities. The student learns how to control disorientation at will. This program corrects the learning disability using the natural strengths and talents of the individual's personal thinking and learning style. It is fun. Many other programs address only the symptoms and involve a lot of repetition (which dyslexics often find boring and tedious).
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Q: What happens during the Davis program?
A: These are the basic procedures:
· Davis Perceptual Ability Assessment. A screening to determine the ability to perceive multi-dimensionally and tailor the program to the student.
· Davis Orientation Counseling. The client learns to perceive accurately and correct perceptions at will. This is done through the perceptual and kinesthetic exercises described in The Gift of Dyslexia. For an online article that describes disorientation, click here.
· Davis Symbol Mastery. Picture thinkers learn best through a visual/spatial approach. Our clients learn the basic symbols of reading and writing by creating the alphabet and other symbols as clay models. Abstract words are mastered by creating the concept of each meaning in clay along with the word. You will see some examples used as illustrations on this web site.
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Q: Can Davis Dyslexia Correction help solve other learning problems?
A: Yes. Here are a few examples:
· Dysgraphia (handwriting difficulties)
· Dyscalculia (math difficulties)
· ADD (attention deficit disorder)
· Auditory perception deficits
· Motor coordination difficulties
· Problems with time and order.
These stem from the same cause as dyslexia, so they too can be corrected.

Q: Why do you say correct instead of cure?
A: Cure implies a malady or ill health (mental or physical). Correct means to remove errors and mistakes, to make right.

Q: How does the program affect a person's self-esteem?
A: Improvement in self-esteem is usually seen in the first few days of the program as the person begins to experience success with learning for the first time.
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Q: Who can benefit from the Davis Program?
A: Adults and children seven years and older who are gifted with dyslexia. Each client must be willing and motivated to pursue the program for self-improvement, not because someone else insists.

Q: How much improvement can be expected at the end of the 5-day Program?
A: Typically, at least a one to two year grade level of improvement can be expected in reading or some other basic skill. The age of the client and initial motivation are factors in how much improvement occurs. Future progress is determined by the individual's motivation, and continued use of Symbol Mastery after the program.

Q: Can someone lose their natural abilities after your program?
A: No. The Davis approach emphasizes and utilizes the natural strengths and talents of the dyslexic thinking and learning style. It unleashes and validates the ability of visual-spatial- kinestethic learners. In fact, any natural abilities are usually enhanced.
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Q: What happens after the program?
A: The client must master a list of 217 trigger words which limit reading comprehension and skill. This can be completed in short tutoring sessions over several months after the basic program. At the rate of five words per week, this can be accomplished within one year. Follow-up support is also included as part of the program. This consists of:
· Student Symbol Mastery Kit (includes manual, dictionary, grammar book, clay and other study aids)
· Training for a tutor, teacher, and family members
· Telephone consultations
· Up to three return visits to review the basic Davis tools, if needed.
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Q: Are there alternatives to the program?
A: Yes. We suggest you:
· read The Gift of Dyslexia and follow the steps
· use instructional videos that will assist you in applying these methods
· attend a workshop and learn how to use the Davis methods with your child or student. For workshop information, or if you want to find a provider in another part of the world, visit the Davis Dyslexia Association International web site.

Q: Can I speak with others who have been through your program?
A: Certainly. We can fax or mail you a list of people who have said they would be happy to share their experiences with others.

Q: What's my next step?
A: By now, you probably have a few questions of your own. E-mail us at [email protected] or call us:
+1 (800) 1-800-729-8990
+1 (650) 692-8990 Pacific Standard Time 9-5
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Q. How can you know whether or not to discontinue phonics instruction with a dyslexic child?
A. The most significant sign that phonics instruction is not working is frustration. If the child regularly shows sign of frustration with any method - such as anger, tears, or unwillingness to proceed -- the attempts to teach by that approach should cease, and another approach should be tried. The biggest mistake is to pursue a course relying on repetition and drill with an unwilling child. Most dyslexic children are very quick to grasp concepts that they easily understand; if a child is slow to learn pre-reading or reading skills, it is a sure sign that the approach is not working. Intensifying the instruction will not help.
Some dyslexic children find it easy to learn to work with phonics and enjoy word puzzles and games involving phonics. If the child is relaxed and enjoying the activity, then it will not do any harm and the child is probably learning. However, a common pattern seen in these types of children is that they will seem to do well in early primary years, but will get "stuck" and not be able to transition from decoding of words to reading fluency. At this point, these children do not need more phonics, but rather they need to learn the visual whole word recognition skills that will bridge the gap between sounding-out words and recognizing and comprehending words by sight. Children like this often make extremely rapid progress with Davis methods, as they already have good foundational skills for reading, and the Davis tools provide the missing link they need to become strong and competent readers.
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Q. After the Davis program, should you continue with phonics instruction, as this will probably be taught in school?
A. Learning phonics and phonetic decoding skills is a primary level reading or pre-reading skill. A child over the age of 8 or 9 should not need more instruction in phonics after the Davis program; emphasis on phonics may cause the child to regress or become confused, and in any event will tend to slow down reading.
Children from ages 5-7 should probably be exposed to both phonetic sounding-out strategies, and to the visual methods taught with Davis Learning Strategies. The teacher or parent should explain that these are different tools to help learn to read, and through observation, help guide the child to use the combination of strategies that work best for him.
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For a program overview with schedule and fees, click here.
For an online assessment, click here.